dia_pink.gif  If you are the birth parent of an adopted person, who is over the age of 21 and was born in Illinois on or after January 1, 1946, the new law allows the Illinois Department of Public Health’s Adoption Registry and Medical Information Exchange ("the Registry") to provide a non-certified copy of your birth child's original birth certificate to certain individuals beginning November 15, 2011.

dia_pink.gif  The Registry may provide copies of the original birth certificate to an adult adopted person over the age of 21 or to their surviving spouse or surviving adult child.

dia_pink.gif  In most cases the original birth certificate will list the first and last names of one or both birth parents.

dia_pink.gif  Please note that adult adopted persons born after January 1, 1946, may not request non-certified copies of their original birth certificates until November 15, 2011.

dia_pink.gif  Under the new law, as the birth parent of an adult adopted person born after January 1, 1946, you have four options:

1. YOU MAY REQUEST ANONYMITY. If you wish to remain anonymous to your birth child, you may request that your first name, last name and/or last known address be deleted from any non-certified copies of the original birth certificate issued during your lifetime. To make your request for anonymity you must sign up with the Registry, complete a Birth Parent Preference Form (click here to download a copy of the Birth Parent Preference Package), and choose Option E on the form.

To be sure that your identifying information does not appear on any non-certified copies of the original birth certificate released during your lifetime, you must have filed a "Denial of Information Exchange" before December 31, 2010, or completed a Birth Parent Preference Form and selected Option E before November 1, 2011.

Any request for anonymity filed after November 1, 2011, can only be honored if the application reaches the Registry before the corresponding adult birth child requests a copy of their original birth certificate.

If your birth child was born after 1991, and you file a request for anonymity after their 21st birthday, your anonymity can only be honored if your application reaches the Registry before  your adult birth child requests a non-certified copy of their original birth certificate.

Please note that all birth parent requests for anonymity and the deletion of identifying information on the non-certified copy of the original birth certificate  expire upon the death of the birth parent.

If it has been  five or more years  since you filed your Denial of Information Exchange or Birth Parent Preference Form with the Registry, the new law authorizes your adult birth son or daughter to request that a state-appointed confidential intermediary contact you to obtain updated medical information  and/or to find out if you still wish to remain anonymous. The Birth Parent Preference Form allows you to indicate how you wish to be contacted for this follow-up search, but the "Denial of Information Exchange" form does not allow you to indicate any contact preferences.

2. YOU MAY REQUEST NO CONTACT. If you are comfortable with the Registry releasing your identifying information to your adult birth son or birth daughter on the non-certified copy of the original birth certificate, but would not welcome contact  with your birth child at this time, you may indicate your wishes by signing up with the Registry after January 1, 2011, completing a Birth Parent Preference Form (click here to download a copy of the Birth Parent Preference Package) and choosing Option D.

To be sure that your desire not to be contacted  reaches your birth child at the same time as the non-certified copy of their original birth certificate, you must have signed up with the Registry, completed a Birth Parent Preference Form and selected Option D before November 1, 2011.

If you file your Birth Parent Preference form after November 1, 2011 (or, if your birth child was born after 1991, complete it after their 21st birthday), a copy of your Form will be sent to your adult birth child at the same time as the non-certified copy of the original birth certificate  only  if your Registry application is received FIRST.

If your Registry application is received after  a non-certified copy of the original birth certificate has been released, the Registry will forward a copy of your Birth Parent Preference Form  to your birth child or their surviving relative at the address on file with the Registry.

3. YOU MAY EXPRESS AN INTEREST IN CONTACT. If you would welcome contact  with your adult birth son or birth daughter, you may indicate your interest in contact by signing up with the Registry after January 1, 2011, completing a Birth Parent Preference Form (click here to obtain a Pdf of the Birth Parent Preference Packet) and choosing one of three contact options:

Option A: Direct contract.

Option B: Contact  through a friend or relative

Option C: Contact through the agency that handled the adoption  or the state's Confidential Intermediary Program.

To be sure that your interest in contact  reaches your adult birth child at the same time  as the non-certified copy of their original birth certificate, you must have signed up with the Registry, completed a Birth Parent Preference Form and selected Option A, B, or C before November 1, 2011.

If you file your Birth Parent Preference Form after November 1, 2011 (or, if your birth child was born after 1991, sign up  after their 21st birthday), a copy of your Form will be sent to your adult birth child at the same time as the non-certified copy of their original birth certificate only  if your Registry application is received FIRST.

If your Registry application is received after a non-certified copy of the original birth certificate has been released, the Registry will forward a copy of your Birth Parent Preference Form to your birth child or their surviving relative at the address on file with the Registry.

4. YOU MAY CHOOSE TO DO NOTHING. If you are comfortable with the Registry providing your identifying information to your adult birth son or birth daughter on the non-certified copy of their original birth certificate, but either do not have an opinion about contact with your adult birth child or do not wish to express an opinion about contact with your adult birth child at this time, the new law does not require you to do anything.

If your adult birth child requests a copy of their original birth certificate, nothing will be changed or deleted from the non-certified copy of the original birth certificate they receive.

If you change your mind about the release of your identifying information, or later decide you would like to indicate your wishes regarding contact to your adult birth child, or provide them with medical or other background information, you can sign up with the Registry at any time.

If your Registry application is received after a non-certified copy of the original birth certificate has been released, the Registry will forward a copy of your Birth Parent Preference Form to your birth child or their surviving relative at the address on file with the Registry.

dia_pink.gif  All birth parents may share medical background information, pictures, and/or written correspondence with their birth son or birth daughter when signing up with the Registry. The Birth Parent Preference Form also gives birth parents the opportunity to provide non-medical background information (height, weight, hair color, religion, hobbies, profession, talents, etc.).

dia_pink.gif  There is a $15 registration fee associated with the Registry, but registrants who voluntarily complete a two-page medical questionnaire on genetically-transmitted diseases do not have to pay the $15.00 fee.

dia_pink.gif  For additional information about the Illinois Adoption Registry and Medical Information Exchange and/or to download the necessary application forms, please click here.

dia_pink.gif  For a listing of the organizations that participated on the Original Birth Certificate Access Oversight Committee, many of which may be able to provide you with additional information on the new law, and/or post-adoption support, search or counseling services, please click here.

dia_pink.gif  The complete text of the new law, Public Act 096-0895, can be found here.

dia_pink.gif  Should you have any questions that were not answered on this web site, please email them to: newillinoisadoptionlaw@gmail.com

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